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UN says ‘humans waging suicidal war on nature’ in new report

‘Humans waging suicidal war on nature’: UN says our lifestlyes are accelerating the erosion of life on earth

  • Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has warned of the triple threat from high pollution, climate change and loss of biodiversity
  • Guterres also offered suggestions of ways out of the crisis in the report called Making Peace With Nature by the UN Environment Programme
  • It includes shifting subsidies worth £3.5trillion from fossil fuels, mining and agriculture to low carbon equivalents and trying to restore nature

Humans have waged a ‘suicidal’ war on nature, the head of the United Nations declared yesterday.

Antonio Guterres warned about the triple threat to the world from high pollution levels, climate change and loss of biodiversity in a report.

The UN Secretary-General said: ‘Humanity is waging war on nature. This is senseless and suicidal. 

‘The consequences of our recklessness are apparent in human suffering, economic losses and the accelerating erosion of life on Earth.’

The climate emergency and pollution has killed millions of people every year and left the planet broken, he said. 

Humans have waged a ‘suicidal’ war on nature, the head of the United Nations declared yesterday. The climate emergency and pollution has killed millions of people every year and left the planet broken, Antonia Guterres said [Stock photo]

Antonio Guterres (pictured) warned about the triple threat to the world from high pollution levels, climate change and loss of biodiversity in a report [File photo]

Antonio Guterres (pictured) warned about the triple threat to the world from high pollution levels, climate change and loss of biodiversity in a report [File photo]

Mr Guterres also offered suggestions of ways out of the crisis in the report called Making Peace With Nature by the UN Environment Programme.

This includes shifting subsidies worth £3.5trillion from fossil fuels, mining and agriculture to low carbon equivalents and trying to restore nature. 

The Treasury commissioned a report that also made similar recommendations.

The UN has urged governments to take ambitious steps at the climate change conference in Glasgow in November to help save nature. 

Commenting on the report, Professor Rachel Warren, from UEA’s School of Environmental Sciences, said it was ‘novel’ in that ‘it brings together the environmental problems of climate change, biodiversity loss, land degradation and pollution together’ and suggested actions to overcome them. 

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