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Covid UK: Bride-to-be, 28, dies of Covid after being rushed to hospital with abdominal pains

A 28-year-old bride-to-be has died with coronavirus after she was admitted to hospital with suspected acute appendicitis. 

Laura Gentry, from Kessingland near Lowestoft, was rushed to hospital with abdominal pains just before the New Year.

She was diagnosed with Covid-19 while on a ward in James Paget University Hospital in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, and put on a ventilator.

Her family said the horse-riding enthusiast, who was engaged to partner Jack Brighouse, then passed away on January 17 in hospital. 

It is not known if she had any other underlying health conditions, or if she contracted the virus while being treated in hospital. 

Friends and family have paid tribute to Ms Gentry, describing the Norfolk care worker as a ‘warm-hearted’ person who could ‘light up any room’. 

Laura Gentry, who was engaged to partner Jack Brighouse, was initially rushed to hospital with abdominal pains just before the New Year. She was diagnosed with Covid-19 while on a ward in James Paget University Hospital in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, and put on a ventilator

Her family said the horse-riding enthusiast, from Kessingland near Lowestoft, tragically passed away weeks later on January 17. Her sister Amy is now raising money for her funeral

 Her family said the horse-riding enthusiast, from Kessingland near Lowestoft, tragically passed away weeks later on January 17. Her sister Amy is now raising money for her funeral

Her sister Amy is now raising money for her funeral, writing on JustGiving: ‘My sister Laura was sadly taken from us far too soon at only 28 years old.

‘I would love to raise some money for her to give her the send off she deserves. She was a beloved daughter, sister, fiancée, niece, cousin and friend to so many.

‘She could light up any room. Laura we missed you today, just like we missed you yesterday. Just like we will tomorrow and for the rest of our lives.’

Her sister’s initial target of £1,000 was smashed within hours, and people have raised nearly £4,000 to help pay for the funeral. 

Ms Gentry worked at a riding school which gives lessons to children with disabilities, her sister told the Eastern Daily Press – adding  that she met her partner Mr Brighouse in 2016 and the pair got engaged in 2018.

Candelit vigils were held last Wednesday in memory of the former Kessingland Primary, Gisleham Middle and Sir John Leman High School.    

Tributes flooded in for Ms Gentry, with Amie Swarbrick posting: ‘The first time I heard you sing was when you sang reflection in middle school.

‘Every single person in the room was wowed by your voice. I hope you knew that we all saw the person you were inside and out.

‘And you were very much loved for who you were.’

Covid UK: Bride-to-be, 28, dies of Covid after being rushed to hospital with abdominal pains

Yesterday the UK recorded 592 new Covid deaths, down one per cent in a week

Yesterday the UK recorded 592 new Covid deaths, down one per cent in a week

Abby Mace commented: ‘Was such a lovely friend to my daughter and always being there for her.’

It comes as Britain’s official coronavirus death toll today passed the grim milestone of 100,000, with data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) showing that, as of January 15, there had been 103,704 Covid fatalities since the pandemic began last year.

The figure is slightly lower than the Department of Health’s tally of 98,531 because the ONS includes all fatalities with Covid on the death certificates, whereas the Government’s figure relies on positive tests.

The new strain sparked a tsunami of infections and hospital admissions that left the UK with the highest Covid death rate in the world.   

Only four countries, the US (421,129), Brazil (217,664), India (153,587) and Mexico (150,273), which have far larger populations, have suffered higher death tolls. 

Experts say one of the driving factors behind the UK’s huge toll has been the Government’s failure to protect frail and elderly people in care homes – who account for a quarter of all deaths.

Separate damning ONS figures show fatalities among care home residents have almost tripled in the last fortnight, as the virus makes a deadly resurgence in the sector. 

The number-crunching body said there were 1,705 deaths reported to the Care Quality Commission in the seven days to January 2, up from 661 a fortnight ago.

Who is at high risk from Covid-19?

People at high risk from coronavirus are those who:

  • have had an organ transplant;
  • are having chemotherapy or antibody treatment for cancer, including immunotherapy;
  • are having an intense course of radiotherapy (radical radiotherapy) for lung cancer;
  • are having targeted cancer treatments that can affect the immune system (such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors);
  • have blood or bone marrow cancer (such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma);
  • have had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant in the past 6 months, or are still taking immunosuppressant medicine;
  • have been told by a doctor you have a severe lung condition (such as cystic fibrosis, severe asthma or severe COPD);
  • have a condition that means you have a very high risk of getting infections (such as SCID or sickle cell);
  • are taking medicine that makes you much more likely to get infections (such as high doses of steroids or immunosuppressant medicine);
  • have a serious heart condition and are pregnant;
  • have a problem with your spleen or your spleen has been removed (splenectomy);
  • are an adult with Down’s syndrome;
  • are an adult who is having dialysis or has severe (stage 5) long-term kidney disease;
  • have been classed as clinically extremely vulnerable, based on clinical judgement and an assessment of your needs.

People at moderate risk from coronavirus are those who:

  • are 70 or older;
  • have a lung condition that’s not severe (such as asthma, COPD, emphysema or bronchitis); 
  • have heart disease (such as heart failure);
  • have diabetes;
  • have chronic kidney disease;
  • have liver disease (such as hepatitis);
  • have a condition affecting the brain or nerves (such as Parkinson’s disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy);
  • have a condition that means they have a high risk of getting infections;
  • are taking medicine that can affect the immune system (such as low doses of steroids);
  • are very obese (a BMI of 40 or above);
  • are pregnant. 

Source: NHS

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