Europe

Spanish government faces no-confidence vote from far-right Vox party

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez is on Thursday set to face a no-confidence motion brought against his government by far-right Vox party.

Vox argues that Sanchez”s administration must go accusing authorities of handling the coronavirus pandemic poorly, as well as labelling it a “fraud” for relying on independent parties.

The third reason it gave of six was the government’s alleged “corruption linked to narco-dictatorships and totalitarian regimes”.

However, it appears the vote, which needs an absolute majority to succeed, lacks the necessary support to topple the government.

The leading opposition — the conservative Popular Party — is unlikely to back Vox and without its votes, the motion has no chance.

“With victims, outbreaks and infections, the truth is that this no-confidence motion is a waste of time,” Popular Party secretary-general Teodoro García Egea said.

The vote will follow a debate that kicked off on Wednesday, during which parliament will hear arguments for and against the motion.

In the session, Vox has unlimited time to explain it’s reasons for wanting its rival out and the government will also have as long as it needs to present its defence.

The remaining parties in parliament then have half an hour each to comment.

If the no-confidence vote were to succeed, it would see the current left-wing coalition government replaced by one with Vox leader Santiago Abascal at the helm.

“Sánchez’s government is the worst in the world that has faced the coronavirus,” Abascal told the parliament’s lower house, adding he thought the administration is the “worst in 80 years of (Spanish) history”.

Vox has made little effort to hide the fact that the motion presented the chance to speak in parliament before the media, without no time limit, which was a unique opportunity.

Spain is set to become the first country in Western Europe to reach 1 million reported infections of the coronavirus.

The country has confirmed more than 34,000 deaths from COVID-19, but experts say the true death toll has likely been impossible to record because of a shortage of tests in the first weeks of the health crisis.

 

We Thank To Our Readers For Your All Contributes. We Still Seek Your Support In Pandemic CoronaVirus.
Donate Bellow For Better Future

[charitable_donation_form campaign_id=57167]

 

Source link

Back to top button
SoundCloud To Mp3